Preventive Care: Immunizations

 
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Vaccines offer safe, effective protection from infectious diseases. Vaccines contain weakened or killed versions of viruses or bacteria. After vaccination, the body develops antibodies that attack these germs. Most vaccines need multiple doses to provide protection. Some vaccines give lifetime immunity, while others require periodic boosters. Health care providers use vaccination schedules to make sure that recommended vaccines are given at the right age and time. Learn more about immunizations for children on our Caring for Kids pages.

Recommended adult immunization schedule
 

 19 through 49 years old   

 50 through 64 years old

 65 years and older

Influenza

Influenza vaccine is recommended every year for all adults

Tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough (pertussis) (TD/Tdap)

Substitute Tdap 1 time for Td; then Td every 10 years

Human papillomavirus
(HPV)

Women and
men through age 26 years old; 3 doses over 6 months

   
Pneumococcal
 1 or more doses if at high risk
 1 or more doses
 Shingles (Shingrix)   2 doses 2-6 months apart

Tdap vaccine: Pregnant women should receive a dose during each pregnancy, ideally at 27 through 36 weeks, to protect themselves and their baby from whooping cough.

Pneumococcal vaccine: Two types of pneumococcal vaccine are available: PCV13 and PPSV23. Talk with your doctor to find out if either or both pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you.

There is currently a shortage of the Shingrix vaccine. Our clinics have a limited supply and the shortage is expected to last through the remainder of 2018. Learn more.

For more information, view the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommendations for vaccinations.